And Babylon Will Never Be Inhabitable

“For thirty-five years of my life, I was, in the proper acceptation of the word a nihilist – not a revolutionary socialist, but a man who believed in nothing. Five years ago my faith came to me. I believed in the doctrine of Jesus, and my whole life underwent a sudden transformation…Life and death ceased to be evil; instead of despair I tasted joy and happiness that death could not take away” – Leo Tolstoy

To Leo Tolstoy, who is considered one of the greatest authors of all time, atheism was temporary as he discovered the joy of Christianity. Others may not be so fortunate, especially in an increasingly secular developed world in which access to other atheists is conveniently provided via social media.

In my time on social media, I have discovered a good number of atheists who pull Bible verses out of context in an effort to discredit its authors and the source from whom the Bible was authored: God. The intention of this blog is to analyze the truth behind a handful of Biblical passages, which have provided sources of controversy to atheists. Additionally, I will show the way God has used the Bible to demonstrate how He keeps His promises.

God’s Promise: Babylon Shall Not Be Inhabited

Jeremiah (51:42) states: “The sea will rise over Babylon; its roaring waves will cover her. Her towns will be desolate, dry and desert land, a land where no one lives, though which no one travels.” Jeremiah (50:13,39) says: “Because of the wrath of the Lord it shall not be inhabited, for it shall be wholly desolate…It shall be no more inhabited forever.”

According to James Kennedy (1999, pp. 11-12) the site of Babylon is “a dry waste, a parched and burning plain…God said it would never be built again – a prophecy totally contrary to all expectations of the past, where every city of the Near East that had been destroyed had been built again. Babylon was situated in the most fertile part of the Euphrates valley, and yet twenty-five hundred years have come and gone, and Babylon to this day remains an uninhabited waste.”

In Narrative of a Journey to the Site of Babylon in 1811, Claudius James Rich states: “For the space of two months throughout the year the ruins of Babylon are inundated by the annual overflowing of the Euphrates so as to render many parts of them inaccessible by converting the valleys into morasses.”

In 323 B.C., Alexander the Great determined that he would make Babylon the capital of his worldwide empire. “He issued six hundred thousand rations to his soldiers to rebuild the city of Babylon. Would God be disproved? History records the fact that immediately after making the declaration to rebuild Babylon, Alexander the Great was struck dead, and the whole enterprise was abandoned” (Kennedy, 1999, pp. 12).

Please go here for details on Isaiah’s prophecies of the fall of Babylon: https://www.ucg.org/beyond-today/a-prophecy-about-babylon-confirms-the-accuracy-of-the-bible

God’s Promise: March around Jericho for 7 Days and Jericho Will Fall

Joshua fought the battle of Jericho, but critics say the battle never occurred. They state that walls do not fall down because of people marching around them. Yet, as Professor John Garstang, who’s an archeologist and British authority on Hittite civilization says, “As for the main fact, there remains no doubt the walls fell outward so completely that the attackers would be able to clamber up and over their ruins into the city” (Kennedy 1999, pp. 20). What is unusual is the fact that archeological evidence demonstrates the walls fell outward, when ordinarily walls fall inward.

God’s Promise: The Stones Will Cry Out

“Some of the Pharisees in the crowd said to Jesus, ‘Teacher, rebuke your disciples!’ I tell you,’ He replied, ‘if they keep quiet, the stones will cry out’” – Luke 19:39-40.

As Millar Burrows of Yale says, “In many cases, archeology has refuted the views of modern critics. In a number of instances it has been shown that these views rest on false assumptions and unreal artificial schemes of historical development. The excessive skepticism of many liberal theologians stems not from careful evaluation of the available data, but from an enormous predisposition against the supernatural” (Kennedy, 1999, pp. 24).

“The archaeological confirmation of the Flood of Noah’s time is enormous. Stories of the Nochian Flood have been found in almost every civilization in the world. Among the most interesting are those found in Babylonia and Acadia. They provide substantially the same description except for the perversions that had entered into the later Babylonian version, written about eight hundred years after the Mosaic account” (Kennedy, 1999, pp. 23).

God’s Promise: I Will Re-build this Temple in Three Days

“Again the high priest asked Him, ‘Are you the Messiah, the Son of the Blessed One?’ ‘I am,’ said Jesus. ‘And you will see the Son of Man sitting at the right hand of the Mighty One and coming on the clouds of heaven’” – Mark 14:61-62. (cf., Daniel 7:13).

The Sanhedrin convicted Jesus on the charge of blasphemy (Mark 14:64; Matthew 26:65). According to Leviticus (24:15), a blasphemer is one who curses God, which is punishable by death by stoning. The Sanhedrin (m. Sanhedrin 7:5) indicates that the blasphemer is only guilty if he pronounces the name of God distinctly. Yet Jesus’ carefully chosen words did not pronounce the name of God distinctly, as He referred to Himself as the “Son of Man” and to God as the “Mighty One.” According to Josephus (in Antiquities) blasphemy was interpreted more broadly as acts or words that violate God’s majesty.

The Sanhedrin were convinced that Jesus was a false prophet, which Deuteronomy 13:2-6 defines as one who leads others astray and Deuteronomy 18:22 defines as one who presumes to speak in the Lord’s name a message that does not come true. These definitions likely led the high priest Annas to question Jesus about His disciples and His teaching (John 18:19).

Jesus was punished by crucifixion instead of stoning, so some critics have argued that the punishment did not fit the crime and therefore, the crucifixion did not happen (Green, McKnight & Marshall 1992). Yet Deuteronomy 21:22-23 states, “If someone is guilty of a capital offense is put to death and their body is exposed on a pole, you must not leave the body hanging on the pole overnight.” The Qumran Temple Scroll (11 QT 64.8, 10-11) interprets the passage as crucifixion, “You shall hang him on the wood so that he dies.” Accordingly, the punishment was appropriate according to Jewish standards and the crucifixion was the means by which the offender was punished and killed.

“But He was pierced for our transgressions, He was crushed for our inequities; the punishment that brought us peace was on Him, and by His wounds we are healed” (Isaiah 53:5). “After He has suffered, He will see the light of life and be satisfied” (Isaiah 53:11).

In John 2:19, Jesus says, “Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it up” (cf., Matthew 26:61, Mark 14:58) Jesus kept His promise and fulfilled Isaiah 53 and other Old Testament prophecies (e.g., Psalm 118:22, Psalm 22) through his death and resurrection.

God’s Promise: Give Thirty Pieces of Silver to the Potter in the House of the Lord

Zechariah 11:12-13 “So they paid me thirty pieces of silver. And the Lord said to me, ‘Throw it to the potter’’ – the handsome price at which they valued me! So I took the thirty pieces of silver and threw them to the potter at the house of the LORD.”

Jeremiah 32:6-10 “The word of the LORD came to me: Hanamel son of Shallum your uncle is going to come to you and say, ‘Buy my field at Anathoth, because as nearest relative it is your right to buy it.’ Then, just as the LORD had said, my cousin Hanamel came to me in the courtyard of the guard and said, ‘Buy my field at Anathoth in the territory of Benjamin. Since it is your right to redeem it and possess it, buy it for yourself.’ I knew that this was the word of the LORD; so I bought the field at Anathoth from my cousin and weighed out for him seventeen shekels (7 ounces or about 200 grams) of silver.'”

In Matthew 27:3-8, Judas’ suicide is recounted. “When Judas, who had betrayed Him, saw that Jesus was condemned, he was seized with remorse and returned the thirty pieces of silver to the chief priests and elders. ‘I have sinned,’ he said, ‘for I have betrayed innocent blood.’ ‘What is that to us?’ they replied. ‘That’s your responsibility.’ So Judas threw the money into the temple and left. Then he went away and hanged himself. The chief priests picked up the coins and said, ‘It is against the law to put this money into the treasury, since it is blood money. So they decided to use the money to buy a potter’s field as a burial place for foreigners. That is why it has been called the Field of Blood to this day.”

Acts 1:18 – 19 continues recounting the passage. “(With the payment he received for his wickedness, Judas bought a field; there he fell headlong, his body burst open and all his intestines spilled out. Everyone in Jerusalem heard about this, so they called that field in their language Akeldama, that is Field of Blood.)”

Biblical scholars note that Judas’ body likely decomposed after his death by hanging, which is why his body burst open when he fell onto the ground. Only a decomposed body would burst in such a way that one’s intestines would spill out. Furthermore, Judas symbolically “bought a field,” as the silver coins he returned to the chief priests ended up being used to purchase a potter’s field.

God’s Promise: This Generation Will Not Pass Away

In Matthew 24:34, Jesus states “Truly I tell you, this generation will not pass away until all these things have happened. Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will never pass away.”

The interpretation of the word “generation” has led some people to believe that Jesus was referring to a generation of people. The original Greek word for generation is “genea (γενεά),” which means generation, race, family, times, or nation. In Acts 14:16, genea translates to times. “In the past times, he let all nations go their own way.” In Acts 15:21, genea also refers to times. “For the Law of Moses has been preached in every city from the earliest times and is read in the synagogues on every Sabbath.” In Philippians 2:15, genea translates as a nation. “That ye may be blameless and harmless, the sons of God, without rebuke, in the midst of a crooked and perverse nation, among whom ye shine as lights in the world.” Some scholars believe genea refers to the nation of Israel. The translation to times may also be the case, considering the earth’s age (4.5BY) and the time since Jesus walked the earth is relatively short.

God’s Final Promise

According to Biblical scholars, the Nicene Creed is the most universally accepted and recognized statements of the Christian faith. And the Nicene Creed offers God’s final promise to us.

“We believe in one God the Father Almighty, Maker of heaven and earth, and of all things visible and invisible. And in one Lord Jesus Christ, the only-begotten Son of God, begotten of the Father before all worlds, God of God, Light of Light, Very God of Very God, begotten, not made, being of one substance with the Father by whom all things were made; who for us men, and for our salvation, came down from heaven, and was incarnate by the Holy Spirit of the Virgin Mary, and was made man, and was crucified also for us under Pontius Pilate. He suffered and was buried, and the third day he rose again according to the Scriptures, and ascended into heaven, and sitteth on the right hand of the Father. And he shall come again with glory to judge both the quick and the dead, whose kingdom shall have no end.”

Thank you for investing the time.

References

Green, J.B., McKnight, S. & Marshall, I.H. (1992). Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels. Downers Grove, IL: Intervarsity Press.

Kennedy, J. (1999). Why I Believe. Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson

 

 

 

3 Replies to “And Babylon Will Never Be Inhabitable”

  1. This my response to your interpretation about the story of the thirty pieces of silver and the end of Judas in Matthew and in Acts of Luke
    The Source of the Story of the Betrayal of Judas Iscariot of Jesus for Thirty Pieces of Silver and his End
    Matthew 27:3 Then Judas, His betrayer, seeing that He had been condemned, was remorseful and brought back the thirty pieces of silver to the chief priests and elders,
    Matthew 27:4 saying, “I have sinned by betraying innocent blood.” And they said, “What is that to us? You see to it!”
    Matthew 27:5 Then he threw down the pieces of silver in the temple and departed, and went and hanged himself.
    Matthew 27:6 But the chief priests took the silver pieces and said, “It is not lawful to put them into the treasury, because they are the price of blood.”
    Matthew 27:7 And they consulted together and bought with them the potter’s field, to bury strangers in.
    Matthew 27:8 Therefore that field has been called the Field of Blood to this day.
    Matthew 27:9 Then was fulfilled what was spoken by Jeremiah the prophet, saying, “And they took the thirty pieces of silver, the value of Him who was priced, whom they of the children of Israel priced,
    Matthew 27:10 “and gave them for the potter’s field, as the Lord directed me.”
    This story can be considered as a model of the way of the Gospels authors dealing with the texts of the Old Testament, and the real reasons for all differences and discrepancies and contradictions, which are included in the Gospels.
    As we notice that Matthew attributed the quoted text to the book of Jeremiah, while the text is in the book of Zechariah!
    And this error is unacceptable, both in terms of theological perspective and literary perspective, because in terms of theological perspective it cannot be inspired by the Holy Spirit or the word of the Lord, because the Holy Spirit does not fall into such as this error, and in terms of literary perspective is unacceptable also, because it needs only to basic knowledge in the Old Testament and quoting the texts accurately. As well as, it erred in saying that the text speaks of Judas and buying the Jews the potter’s field, as we will see later. In addition, that the other Gospels authors did not agree with him in the saying that Judas betrayed Jesus for thirty pieces of silver. Finally, he contrasts with with Luke about the end of Judas, because Luke has quoted another text from the Old Testament to talk about the end of Judas, who was unsuccessful also to prove his story about the end of Judas.
    As for the saying that Judas had betrayed Jesus for thirty pieces of silver, none of other Gospels authors agreed with him, as in the following texts:
    Mark 14:10 Then Judas Iscariot, one of the twelve, went to the chief priests to betray Him to them.
    Mark 14:11 And when they heard it, they were glad, and promised to give him money. So he sought how he might conveniently betray Him.
    Luke 22:1 Now the Feast of Unleavened Bread drew near, which is called Passover.
    Luke 22:2 And the chief priests and the scribes sought how they might kill Him, for they feared the people.
    Luke 22:3 Then Satan entered Judas, surnamed Iscariot, who was numbered among the twelve.
    Luke 22:4 So he went his way and conferred with the chief priests and captains, how he might betray Him to them.
    Luke 22:5 And they were glad, and agreed to give him money.
    John 13:2 And supper being ended, the devil having already put it into the heart of Judas Iscariot, Simon’s son, to betray Him,
    As we read that Mark and Luke say that Judas has betrayed Jesus for money, without specifying the number of it, and this may be because they have relied upon another text in the Old Testament to write their story, which is as follows:
    Amos 2:6 Thus says the LORD: “For three transgressions of Israel, and for four, I will not turn away its punishment, Because they sell the righteous for silver, And the poor for a pair of sandals.
    This text talks about selling the righteous man for silver, without specifying the number of it, and I do think that the reason why they have ignored to attribute their story to the Old Testament is that it was very difficult for them to write another story beside it talking about selling the poor for a pair of sandals who was mentioned in the text of Amos!
    As for John; he did not mention the thirty pieces of silver or money, because how can he write that Judas betrayed Jesus for thirty pieces of silver or for money, while he had written about a woman poured perfume on Jesus’ feet was worth three hundred denarii, which means that Judas, who was described by John as a thief and has the money box, was capable to steal more than this paltry amount without having to hand over Jesus for thirty pieces of silver or money! As in the following text:
    John 12:3 Then Mary took a pound of very costly oil of spikenard, anointed the feet of Jesus, and wiped His feet with her hair. And the house was filled with the fragrance of the oil.
    John 12:4 Then one of His disciples, Judas Iscariot, Simon’s son, who would betray Him, said,
    John 12:5 “Why was this fragrant oil not sold for three hundred denarii and given to the poor?”
    John 12:6 This he said, not that he cared for the poor, but because he was a thief, and had the money box; and he used to take what was put in it.
    As for the error in the saying of Matthew that the text speaks of Judas Iscariot, this will be known by reading the text of Zechariah, chapter XI, which is as follows:
    Zechariah 10:11 He shall pass through the sea with affliction, And strike the waves of the sea: All the depths of the River shall dry up. Then the pride of Assyria shall be brought down, And the scepter of Egypt shall depart.
    Zechariah 10:12 “So I will strengthen them in the LORD, And they shall walk up and down in His name,” Says the LORD.
    Zechariah 11:1 Open your doors, O Lebanon, That fire may devour your cedars.
    Zechariah 11:2 Wail, O cypress, for the cedar has fallen, Because the mighty trees are ruined. Wail, O oaks of Bashan, For the thick forest has come down.
    Zechariah 11:3 There is the sound of wailing shepherds! For their glory is in ruins. There is the sound of roaring lions! For the pride of the Jordan is in ruins.
    These paragraphs talk about the calamities and afflictions that will occur in the Holy land; and this did not happen in Jesus’ time, as is well known to all.
    Zechariah 11:4 Thus says the LORD my God, “Feed the flock for slaughter,
    Zechariah 11:5 “whose owners slaughter them and feel no guilt; those who sell them say, ‘Blessed be the LORD, for I am rich’; and their shepherds do not pity them.
    Zechariah 11:6 “For I will no longer pity the inhabitants of the land,” says the LORD. “But indeed I will give everyone into his neighbor’s hand and into the hand of his king. They shall attack the land, and I will not deliver them from their hand.”
    These paragraphs say that the LORD asked someone to feed the flock for slaughter, who their owners slaughter them and feel no guilt, and their shepherds do not pity them, and then says the Lord “For I will no longer pity the inhabitants of the land”, “But indeed I will give everyone into his neighbor’s hand and into the hand of his king, they shall attack the land, and I will not deliver them from their hand”.
    Then we read the following paragraphs:
    Zechariah 11:7 So I fed the flock for slaughter, in particular the poor of the flock. I took for myself two staffs: the one I called Beauty, and the other I called Bonds; and I fed the flock.
    Hebrew Version:
    11:7 So I fed the flock of slaughter, verily the poor of the flock. And I took unto me two staves; the one I called Graciousness, and the other I called Binders; and I fed the flock.
    This paragraph shows that the man who was asked by the LORD to feed the flock; that he has fed the flock for slaughter, and took for himself two staffs, or staves or bands or sticks or rods according to the various versions, the one he called Beauty or Grace or Delight or No’am [pleasantness] according to the various versions, and the other called Bonds or Union or Harmony or Hovalim [bound together] according to the various versions, and this does not apply to Judas, which Matthew said that this text was fulfilled when he betrayed Jesus for thirty pieces of silver, as well as, does not apply to Jesus who was described by the Gospels authors and the churches as a shepherd, because they did not have two staffs or staves or bands or sticks or rods, and the one called Beauty or Grace or Delight or No’am [pleasantness], and the other called Bonds or Union or Harmony or Hovalim [bound together].
    Zechariah 11:8 I dismissed the three shepherds in one month. My soul loathed them, and their soul also abhorred me.
    Zechariah 11:9 Then I said, “I will not feed you. Let what is dying die, and what is perishing perish. Let those that are left eat each other’s flesh.”
    Hebrew Version:
    11:8 And I cut off the three shepherds in one month; ‘for My soul became impatient of them, and their soul also loathed Me.’
    These paragraphs say that the speaker dismissed, (or got rid, or put an end, or removed, or destroyed, or annihilated, or disposed according to the various versions) the three shepherds in one month, and his soul loathed them, and their soul also abhorred him, then says “I will not feed you, let what is dying die, and what is perishing perish, let those that are left eat each other’s flesh”, and these paragraphs undoubtedly did not indicate to Jesus or to Judas, because the Gospels did not mention any story says that Jesus or Judas dismissed or got rid or put an end or removed or destroyed or annihilated or disposed three shepherds in one month or even throughout their lives, whether it was intended the kings or the rulers or the governors or the shepherds!
    Zechariah 11:10 And I took my staff, Beauty, and cut it in two, that I might break the covenant which I had made with all the peoples.
    Zechariah 11:11 So it was broken on that day. Thus the poor of the flock, who were watching me, knew that it was the word of the LORD.
    King James Version
    Zechariah 11:10 And I took my staff, [even] Beauty, and cut it asunder, that I might break my covenant which I had made with all the people.
    Zechariah 11:11 And it was broken in that day: and so the poor of the flock that waited upon me knew that it [was] the word of the LORD.
    In these paragraphs we read that the speaker has taken his staff, Beauty, and cut it in two or asunder, and broke the covenant which he had made with all the peoples, and this certainly did not refer to Judas or Jesus, because the Gospels did not say that any of them has owned a staff called Beauty and cut it in two or asunder, and broke the covenant with all the peoples.
    Zechariah 11:12 Then I said to them, “If it is agreeable to you, give me my wages; and if not, refrain.” So they weighed out for my wages thirty pieces of silver.
    Zechariah 11:13 And the LORD said to me, “Throw it to the potter” — that princely price they set on me. So I took the thirty pieces of silver and threw them into the house of the LORD for the potter.
    Hebrew Version
    Zechariah 11:12 And I said unto them: ‘If ye think good, give me my hire; and if not, forbear.’ So they weighed for my hire thirty pieces of silver.
    Zechariah 11:13 And the LORD said unto me: ‘ Cast it into the treasury, the goodly price that I was prized at of them.’ And I took the thirty pieces of silver, and cast them into the treasury, in the house of the LORD.
    Septuagint Version
    Zechariah 11:12 And I will say to them, If it be good in your eyes, give me my price, or refuse it. And they weighed for my price thirty pieces of silver.
    Zechariah 11:13 And the Lord said to me, Drop them into the furnace, and I will see if it is good metal, as I was proved for their sakes. And I took the thirty pieces of silver, and cast them into the furnace in the house of the Lord.
    These are the paragraphs, which are cited by Matthew in the story of the thirty pieces of silver, and as usual, he has distorted and manipulated the words and the meaning of it, as we read in the various versions, because these paragraphs talk about the thirty pieces of silver as a wage for the speaker, who had taken his staff, Beauty, and cut it in two, and broke the covenant with all peoples, and has no any indication to Judas’ betrayal, it also does not talk about buying the potter’s field as Matthew wrote, but says “and threw them into the house of the LORD for the potter” or “and cast them into the treasury” or “and cast them into the furnace in the house of the Lord”.
    These paragraphs do not show that they do not talk about Judas only, but show also that Matthew has distorted and manipulated the words and meanings in order to serve his story; otherwise he should know that this text is written in the Book of Zechariah not in the Book of Jeremiah!
    Matthew 27:9 Then was fulfilled what was spoken by Jeremiah the prophet, saying, “And they took the thirty pieces of silver, the value of Him who was priced, whom they of the children of Israel priced,
    Matthew 27:10 “and gave them for the potter’s field, as the Lord directed me.”
    Zechariah 11:14 Then I cut in two my other staff, Bonds, that I might break the brotherhood between Judah and Israel.
    This paragraph shows clearly that this text was not talking about Judas, because it states that the speaker has cut in two his other staff, Bonds, that he might break the brotherhood between Judah and Israel, while the Gospels did not tell us that Judas had have a staff called Bond, as well as, Matthew says that Judas Iscariot after throwing down the pieces of silver in the temple departed, and went and hanged himself!
    Zechariah 11:15 And the LORD said to me, “Next, take for yourself the implements of a foolish shepherd.
    Zechariah 11:16 “For indeed I will raise up a shepherd in the land who will not care for those who are cut off, nor seek the young, nor heal those that are broken, nor feed those that still stand. But he will eat the flesh of the fat and tear their hooves in pieces.
    Zechariah 11:17 “Woe to the worthless shepherd, Who leaves the flock! A sword shall be against his arm And against his right eye; His arm shall completely wither, And his right eye shall be totally blinded.”
    These paragraphs confirm that the text was not talking about Judas nor Jesus’ time, because the LORD said to the speaker “Next take for yourself the implements of a foolish shepherd, for indeed I will raise up a shepherd in the land”, and this does not apply to Judas because Matthew wrote that he hanged himself after throwing the thirty pieces of silver.
    From all of the above, we conclude that Matthew wrote his story based on the text of Zechariah, despite he was not able to remember the Book that mentioned it, for this he attributed it to the book of Jeremiah, away from the revelation and the Holy Spirit, as well as away from historical events, and what confirms this conclusion is what was written by Luke about the end of Judas Iscariot in the Acts of the Apostles, which is as follows:
    21 – The Source of the Story of the End of Judas Iscariot in the Acts of Apostles
    Act 1:15 And in those days Peter stood up in the midst of the disciples (altogether the number of names was about a hundred and twenty), and said,
    Act 1:16 “Men and brethren, this Scripture had to be fulfilled, which the Holy Spirit spoke before by the mouth of David concerning Judas, who became a guide to those who arrested Jesus;
    Act 1:17 “for he was numbered with us and obtained a part in this ministry.”
    Act 1:18 (Now this man purchased a field with the wages of iniquity; and falling headlong, he burst open in the middle and all his entrails gushed out.
    Act 1:19 And it became known to all those dwelling in Jerusalem; so that field is called in their own language, Akel Dama, that is, Field of Blood.)
    Act 1:20 “For it is written in the book of Psalms: ‘Let his dwelling place be desolate, And let no one live in it’; and, ‘Let another take his office’.
    In this text Luke writes the story of the end of Judas Iscariot, and as we read it contains several differences with Matthew’s story including the following:
    The first is that he says that Judas is the one who purchased the field, not the chief priests and the elders as Matthew said.
    The second is that the death of Judas Iscariot was as a result of his falling headlong, and he burst open in the middle, and all his entrails gushed out; and to demonstrate the credibility of his story, he said it became known to all those dwelling in Jerusalem, except Matthew of course, who says that he hung himself!
    And then he cited what is written in the Psalms, not from Zechariah or Jeremiah as Matthew did, for this we find these differences and contradictions between Matthew and Luke in this story, because their way or method or approach of writing was based on the Old Testament texts, not on the historical events that were seen or heard from trusted sources, or on the revelation and the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, otherwise, they should write the same stories.
    Apart from all this; is it true that what is written in the book of Psalms that cited by Luke was talking or prophesying about the end of Judas Iscariot?
    As we read that Luke has cited in his story to demonstrate the credibility of what he has written about the end of Judas Iscariot by saying: “For it is written in the book of Psalms: ‘Let his dwelling place be desolate, and let no one live in it’; and, ‘Let another take his office’.
    The first thing what comes to the mind is that this paragraph written in one Psalm, but the fact is that this paragraph written in two Psalms, and this is a new way or method or approach of quoting from the Old Testament!
    Because we may believe that a specific paragraph had prophesied about an issue or an event, but collecting some paragraphs, one from here and another from there, then say it was a prophecy about some issues or events, I think this needs a clear evidence for this saying, and there is no clear evidence better than reading the whole texts, which had mentioned those paragraphs, and in this case, Luke has quoted the paragraphs from Psalm 69 and Psalm 109, and said it is written in the book of Psalms, so what is written in the Psalms?
    I had examined the Psalm 69 previously in detail, and showed that it was not talking about Jesus or about his time, for this, I will mention only the paragraphs that cited by Luke, which is as follows:
    Psalm 69:22 Let their table become a snare before them, And their well-being a trap.
    Psalm 69:23 Let their eyes be darkened, so that they do not see; And make their loins shake continually.
    Psalm 69:24 Pour out Your indignation upon them, And let Your wrathful anger take hold of them.
    Psalm 69:25 Let their dwelling place be desolate; Let no one live in their tents.
    Psalm 69:26 For they persecute the ones You have struck, And talk of the grief of those You have wounded.
    Psalm 69:27 Add iniquity to their iniquity, And let them not come into Your righteousness.
    Psalm 69:28 Let them be blotted out of the book of the living, And not be written with the righteous.
    Psalm 69:29 But I am poor and sorrowful; Let Your salvation, O God, set me up on high.
    Hebrew Version
    Psalm 69:24 Let their eyes be darkened, that they see not; and make their loins continually to totter.
    Psalm 69:25 Pour out Thine indignation upon them, and let the fierceness of Thine anger overtake them.
    Psalm 69:26 Let their encampment be desolate; let none dwell in their tents.
    Psalm 69:27 For they persecute him whom Thou hast smitten; and they tell of the pain of those whom Thou hast wounded.
    Septuagint Version
    Psalm 69:24 Pour out thy wrath upon them, and let the fury of thine anger take hold on them.
    Psalm 69:25 Let their habitation be made desolate; and let there be no inhabitant in their tents:
    Psalm 69:26 Because they persecuted him whom thou hast smitten; and they have added to the grief of my wounds.
    As we see that Luke has changed the wording of the text of Psalm, because the paragraphs in all versions do not talk about one person, but about a group of people, and this indicates that he has not received any inspiration of the Holy Spirit, as well as, he did not have literary Integrity, otherwise he will not change the wording of the words from plural to singular!
    And finally he has written a story contradicts what was written by Matthew.
    This is about the first part of the paragraph that cited by Luke, so what about the second part?
    The second part of the paragraph is written in Psalm 109, which is as follows:
    Psalm 109:1 <> Do not keep silent, O God of my praise!
    Psalm 109:2 For the mouth of the wicked and the mouth of the deceitful Have opened against me; They have spoken against me with a lying tongue.
    Psalm 109:3 They have also surrounded me with words of hatred, And fought against me without a cause.
    Psalm 109:4 In return for my love they are my accusers, But I give myself to prayer.
    Psalm 109:5 Thus they have rewarded me evil for good, And hatred for my love.
    The speaker in the Psalm begins asking God not to keep silent! For the mouth of the wicked and the mouth of the deceitful have opened against him; they have spoken against him with a lying tongue, and they have surrounded him with words of hatred, and fought against him without a cause, and in return for his love they are his accusers, but he gives himself to prayer. Here if we said that the speaker is David it will be true and applies to him as is written in the Old Testament about his life, but if we consider that he is Jesus as Luke thinks or more specifically as he tries to convince the good people of the followers of the churches to believe; will face many problems including the following:
    The first is the contradiction with the laws of the faith of the churches that say that Jesus is one of three Persons who are one and have the same nature and essence, and this speaker asks his God.
    The second is that the speaker says that people have surrounded him with words of hatred, and fought against him without a cause, while the Gospels did not mention that the Jews or the Romans have fought against Jesus, but John wrote that the Jews have surrounded Jesus, and I think he had quoted his story from this paragraph, as in the following text:
    John 10:24 Then the Jews surrounded Him and said to Him, “How long do You keep us in doubt? If You are the Christ, tell us plainly.”
    And there is a big difference between what John wrote and what is written in the Psalm, because John wrote that they surrounded Jesus to ask him if he is the Christ or not, while the Psalm speaks about surrounding for fighting, As well as, the Gospels did not say that the Jews had rejected Jesus without a cause, because John has written the cause of why they arrested him; which is that he said that the God was his father and making himself equal to the God, and he being a man makes himself god and the son of God, as in the following texts:
    John 5:18 Therefore the Jews sought all the more to kill Him, because He not only broke the Sabbath, but also said that God was His Father, making Himself equal with God.
    John 10:33 The Jews answered Him, saying, “For a good work we do not stone You, but for blasphemy, and because You, being a Man, make Yourself God.”
    John 19:7 The Jews answered him, “We have a law, and according to our law He ought to die, because He made Himself the Son of God.”
    Psalm 109:6 Set a wicked man over him, And let an accuser stand at his right hand.
    Psalm 109:7 When he is judged, let him be found guilty, And let his prayer become sin.
    But now let’s agree with Luke and continue reading the Psalm:
    Psalm 109:8 Let his days be few, And let another take his office.
    The last paragraph is the paragraph, which Luke has quoted with the paragraph from the Psalm 69 to find an excuse to choose another disciple to replace Judas, and said it became known to all those dwelling in Jerusalem, except Matthew of course!
    We also note that these paragraphs do not apply to Judas in any event, and I do not want to say it applies to Jesus himself more than Judas! Because Jesus was judged and was found guilty, and his prayer has not been accepted, whether on the night of his arrest, when his disciples were asleep, or on the cross when he cried out with a loud voice, saying, “Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani?” that is, “My God, My God, why have You forsaken Me?” (Matthew 27:46), and Jesus cried out with a loud voice, saying, “Eloi, Eloi, lama sabachthani?” which is translated, “My God, My God, why have You forsaken Me?” (Mark 15:34).
    Moreover the days of Jesus were a few, and did not complete his mission, and his office was given to another! As in the following texts:
    John 14:26 “But the Helper, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in My name, He will teach you all things, and bring to your remembrance all things that I said to you.
    John 16:7 “Nevertheless I tell you the truth. It is to your advantage that I go away; for if I do not go away, the Helper will not come to you; but if I depart, I will send Him to you.
    John 16:8 “And when He has come, He will convict the world of sin, and of righteousness, and of judgment:
    John 16:12 “I still have many things to say to you, but you cannot bear them now.
    John 16:13 “However, when He, the Spirit of truth, has come, He will guide you into all truth; for He will not speak on His own authority, but whatever He hears He will speak; and He will tell you things to come.
    Even though this similarity between these paragraphs and Jesus, I do not say it applies to him, but they certainly do not apply to Judas, especially as we have read the differences between Luke and Matthew about the end of Judas.
    Psalm 109:9 Let his children be fatherless, And his wife a widow.
    Psalm 109:10 Let his children continually be vagabonds, and beg; Let them seek their bread also from their desolate places.
    Psalm 109:11 Let the creditor seize all that he has, And let strangers plunder his labor.
    Psalm 109:12 Let there be none to extend mercy to him, Nor let there be any to favor his fatherless children.
    Psalm 109:13 Let his posterity be cut off, And in the generation following let their name be blotted out.
    Psalm 109:14 Let the iniquity of his fathers be remembered before the LORD, And let not the sin of his mother be blotted out.
    Psalm 109:15 Let them be continually before the LORD, That He may cut off the memory of them from the earth;
    As for these paragraphs, the Gospels and the rest of the letters of the New Testament did not tell us any story about them especially that the creditor has seized all that Judas possesses, and the strangers have plundered his labor!
    As well as, these curses contradict what is written in Luke’s Gospel, as in the following text:
    Luke 23:34 Then Jesus said, “Father, forgive them, for they do not know what they do.” And they divided His garments and cast lots.
    Psalm 109:16 Because he did not remember to show mercy, But persecuted the poor and needy man, That he might even slay the broken in heart.
    In this paragraph, the speaker in the Psalm says that he cursed the evil man because he did not remember to show mercy, but persecuted the poor and needy man, that he might even slay the broken in heart! Not to betray Jesus for thirty pieces of silver!
    Psalm 109:17 As he loved cursing, so let it come to him; As he did not delight in blessing, so let it be far from him.
    Psalm 109:18 As he clothed himself with cursing as with his garment, So let it enter his body like water, And like oil into his bones.
    Psalm 109:19 Let it be to him like the garment which covers him, And for a belt with which he girds himself continually.
    In these paragraphs the speaker continues for cursing the evil man, which the Gospels have not mentioned that Jesus has cursed Judas such as these curses.
    Psalm 109:20 Let this be the LORD’S reward to my accusers, And to those who speak evil against my person.
    Psalm 109:21 But You, O GOD the Lord, Deal with me for Your name’s sake; Because Your mercy is good, deliver me.
    From these paragraphs the speaker begins talks about himself, by saying, ” O GOD the Lord, deal with me for Your name’s sake; because Your mercy is good, deliver me.
    Psalm 109:22 For I am poor and needy, And my heart is wounded within me.
    Psalm 109:23 I am gone like a shadow when it lengthens; I am shaken off like a locust.
    Are these descriptions of the attributes of the LORD the Creator of the heavens and the earth, or Jesus? No comment!
    Psalm 109:24 My knees are weak through fasting, And my flesh is feeble from lack of fatness.
    Psalm 109:25 I also have become a reproach to them; When they look at me, they shake their heads.
    Psalm 109:26 Help me, O LORD my God! Oh, save me according to Your mercy,
    So, do these descriptions indicate to a person who has any divine attributes, or it indicates to an ordinary person?
    And here we must ask a question; why the LORD did not save Jesus, forcing him to cry out on the cross “My God, My God, why have You forsaken me?”?!
    Psalm 109:27 That they may know that this is Your hand — That You, LORD, have done it!
    Psalm 109:28 Let them curse, but You bless; When they arise, let them be ashamed, But let Your servant rejoice.
    The last paragraph shows that the speaker in the Psalm is a servant of the Lord, not a god or the son of God or one of the three Hypostases who are one and have the same nature and essence as the churches say about Jesus.
    So, if the speaker is a servant of the Lord, why Luke quoted from this Psalm, and said it was talking about Jesus and Judas, although Matthew had written a story contradicts his story, unless it was a method or an approach of the writing to write the Gospels away from the Revelation and the Historical Events?!
    And the rest of the Psalm says that the speaker will greatly praise the LORD with his mouth among the multitude, for He shall stand at the right hand of the poor to save him from those who condemn him.
    Psalm 109:29 Let my accusers be clothed with shame, And let them cover themselves with their own disgrace as with a mantle.
    Psalm 109:30 I will greatly praise the LORD with my mouth; Yes, I will praise Him among the multitude.
    Psalm 109:31 For He shall stand at the right hand of the poor, To save him from those who condemn him.
    From all of the above, we find that Matthew and Luke have relied upon the Old Testament to write their story about the end of Judas Iscariot as is their way or method or approach of writing; for this Matthew wrote the text of Zechariah, but unfortunately, he attributed it to Jeremiah! And Luke collect one paragraph from the Psalm 69 and another paragraph from the Psalm 109 to say that his story occurred; for it is written in the Book of Psalms, and the result is that they have written two different stories, despite they were writing about one person and one specific event! And this proves that our law “do not accept the lying and false” applies to the story of Judas Iscariot betrayal and his end in the New Testament.

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