A Reconciliation of the 4 Empty Tomb Accounts in the Gospels

Some have claimed that Jesus' empty tomb accounts by Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John are contradictory and impossible to reconcile. Yet such claims are riddled with underlying assumptions that are not given in the text, such as the women visited the empty tomb only once or they traveled in a pack and never separated from …

How Are the Prophet Daniel, Antiochus IV, and Hanukkah Related?

In the 6th century B.C., Daniel prophesied the four kingdoms of Babylon, Medo-Persia, Greece, and Rome through Nebuchadnezzar’s dream in Daniel 2 and in his own visions and dreams in Daniel 7 and 8. Greece would be like a leopard with “four wings of a bird on its back.”[1] Alexander the Great ruled Greece between …

Should the Longer Ending of Mark be in the Gospels?

People have contested whether Mark 16:9-10 should be included in Mark's Gospel by noting its exclusion by the Codex Vaticanus and the Codex Sinaiticus, which were assembled in the 4th century A.D. However, we have multiple attestations to inclusion in earlier texts. People have fought against one another on inclusion or exclusion for the past …

Josephus Debunked Critical Scholars’ Late Dating Claims of Daniel and Isaiah

Around the 1800s, "critical" scholars in German universities realized the divine implications of fulfilled prophecies in the Bible, so rather than accept their possibility, they produced theories to discredit the original authorship and dating of books by Isaiah, Daniel, and others. Their theories are often complicated (such as proposing multiple authors over centuries and mysterious …

A Little History on a Faulty “Scholarly” Notion: Deutero Isaiah

The faulty notion that the book of Isaiah had multiple authors over centuries (rather than a single author ~700 BC) was first shoveled into Biblical thought by Abraham Ibn Ezra in 1145 AD. Before that, everyone (including numerous people in the New Testament, such as Jesus, John, and Paul) attributed the book to a single …

English Translations of Psalm 22:16, 110:1; Isaiah 53:11, John 3:16, and Acts 8:37

Some English translations of the Bible are superior to others but no one translation is always the best. It seems evident that we may have some wolves in sheep's clothing on the translation committees of some English versions of the Bible, such as the NRSV. In this blog, I make a case for reading multiple …